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Utah Guard's Brig. Gen. Harrison retires after 35 years

Maj. Gen. Brian L. Tarbet, The Adjutant General of the Utah National Guard, awards Brig. Gen. Scott Harrison the Joint Medal of Merit for his service during a retirement ceremony on January 9 at the Utah Air National Guard Base. General Harrison was the deputy commander of Joint Forces Headquarters, Utah NG, and officially retired from the Guard after 35 years.   U.S. Air Force Photo by: Staff Sgt. Emily Monson (RELEASED)

Maj. Gen. Brian L. Tarbet, The Adjutant General of the Utah National Guard, awards Brig. Gen. Scott Harrison the Joint Medal of Merit for his service during a retirement ceremony on January 9 at the Utah Air National Guard Base. General Harrison was the deputy commander of Joint Forces Headquarters, Utah NG, and officially retired from the Guard after 35 years. U.S. Air Force Photo by: Staff Sgt. Emily Monson (RELEASED)

SALT LAKE CITY -- Brig. Gen. Scott B. Harrison, deputy commander of Joint Forces Headquarters of the Utah National Guard, formally retired from the Guard in a ceremony at the Utah Air National Guard Base January 9.

General Harrison is a 35-year veteran, and has served as deputy commander since 2006. During the ceremony, The Adjutant General, Maj. Gen. Brian L. Tarbet, awarded General Harrison the Joint Medal of Merit for his Joint Forces service, and then publicly thanked him.

"What you have done in the service these last three decades has kept this county safe," said General Tarbet. "You can be very proud of all you've done."

General Harrison began his military career in 1974 with the active-duty Air Force. He served as both a navigator and instructor navigator on the KC-135 Stratotanker's A and D models. In 1987, General Harrison joined the Utah Air National Guard, serving as an instructor, evaluator navigator and operations officer on the KC-135E model. He is a master navigator with over 5,000 flight hours.

"In this man's history is our nation's history," said General Tarbet, as he explained some of General Harrison's military contributions.

General Harrison has flown and participated in several combat and overseas military operations. He was awarded the Bronze Star for his service in Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. He also served in Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Provide Comfort, Deny Flight and Allied Force. Additionally, General Harrison served a three-year tour in England as a command-post controller and senior controller. During his career, General Harrison received more than 15 other meritorious service awards and decorations.

Among General Harrison's recent services, he provided security and ancillary support for the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City. He also provided extensive support to Task Force Utah in the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. He developed, orchestrated and implemented the reception and operations plan of nearly 600 evacuees from Louisiana.

Brig. Gen. Michael Liechty, commander of the Utah NG Land Component Command, described General Harrison as someone who is sincere in what he does, and one who loves his Soldiers and Airmen. He also accredited the great progress Utah Joint Forces has made to General Harrison.

"He has done more to bring the army and air together than anyone else," said General Liechty.

In his retirement speech, General Harrison explained his motto has been to, "Get the job done, and take care of the people who did it."

General Harrison is a resident of Sandy, Utah. He comes from a military family, and has five brothers. He also has a wife of 36 years, and 12 children. General Harrison described his family as a hundred different personalities all working together.

He also addressed the military members of the audience in his speech.

"Your career goes by fast," said General Harrison. "Take advantage of every single day you get to work here. It is a privilege to work for the Utah National Guard. When I look out over the audience I see massive practiced confidence, and I am confident that there isn't any problem that we can't solve."