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Airman resiliency reinforced through “Four Pillars” during Wingman Day

Utah Adjutant General, Maj. Gen. Jefferson Burton addresses the Utah Air National Guard at the beginning of Wingman Day.  The UTANG holds Wingman Day annually to give their Airmen a chance to learn how to take better care of themselves physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually.  Burton reminded the Airmen that today was a day for them to take care of themselves from the neck up. (Utah Air National Guard Photo by TSgt Kelly Collett/Released)

Utah Adjutant General, Maj. Gen. Jefferson Burton addresses the Utah Air National Guard at the beginning of Wingman Day. The UTANG holds Wingman Day annually to give their Airmen a chance to learn how to take better care of themselves physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually. Burton reminded the Airmen that today was a day for them to take care of themselves from the neck up. (Utah Air National Guard Photo by TSgt Kelly Collett/Released)

Utah Air National Guard State Command Chief, CMSgt Michael Edwards reiterates the message of safety and looking out for one another during the morning message from the leadership that kicked off Wingman Day.  The Utah Air National Guard holds Wingman Day in order to provide some time to their Airmen to strengthen themselves; physically, mentally, emotionally and socially. (Utah Air National Guard photo by TSgt Kelly Collett/Released 2014)

Utah Air National Guard State Command Chief, CMSgt Michael Edwards reiterates the message of safety and looking out for one another during the morning message from the leadership that kicked off Wingman Day. The Utah Air National Guard holds Wingman Day in order to provide some time to their Airmen to strengthen themselves; physically, mentally, emotionally and socially. (Utah Air National Guard photo by TSgt Kelly Collett/Released 2014)

Airmen from the Utah National Guard, located at the Salt Lake City Airbase, take time on Wingman Day to participate in a team-building exercise.  Wingman Day is held annually for the UTANG Airmen to strengthen themselves physically, mentally, socially and spiritually. (Utah Air National Guard photo by TSgt Kelly Collett/Released 2014)

Airmen from the Utah National Guard, located at the Salt Lake City Airbase, take time on Wingman Day to participate in a team-building exercise. Wingman Day is held annually for the UTANG Airmen to strengthen themselves physically, mentally, socially and spiritually. (Utah Air National Guard photo by TSgt Kelly Collett/Released 2014)

Salt Lake City --

The Utah Air National Guard annual Wingman Day was held May 4 at the Salt Lake Air Guard Base.  Airmen were guided through breakout sessions on resiliency strategies in the physical, mental, spiritual, and social aspects of their lives.

The theme for this year's Wingman Day was "Airmen 4 Airmen," suggesting Airmen need to remember to be a wingman to their fellow Guardsmen, and using tools in four pillars of resiliency to support themselves and each other.

Chief Master Sgt. Michael Edwards, Utah State Command Chief Master Sergeant, outlined each pillar, explaining why each one is important to overall resiliency.

"Mental means approaching challenges in a positive way," said Edwards.  "Physical is keeping yourself physically fit, leading to a better attitude, more ability, mental health, and strength.  Social means maintaining trusted, valued friendship.  Spiritual is to have purpose and meaning in your life.  Having these pillars in your life will increase your well-being, your resiliency, and mission success."

Col. Darwin Craig, 151st Air Refueling Wing Commander, asked Airmen to live with the distractions in the world like phones and internet, but to not allow those distractions to take away their attention from more important matters.

"Obviously, put down the phone while you're driving, but in your life, with your families, take the time to put some of the distractions down and spend time with them," said Craig.

Maj. Gen. Jefferson S. Burton, The Adjutant General for the Utah National Guard, said Airmen need personal resiliency as a tool during difficult times.

"Our brain is the most important thing that we've got," said Burton.  "We talk about maintenance all the time, fixing our jets, fixing our equipment, servicing our weapons.  We need to take care of ourselves from the neck up, too."